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Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
CBS
Oct 14, 2012 5:00am PDT
. >> good morning. mosaic. a special program for us. the bay area has a lot of talented people. we are delighted to bring you dr. snyder the professor of biblical studies and spirituality. and a sister of the sisters servants of the immaculate heart of mary. did i say that close? okay. thank you. welcome. welcome. in short, dr. snyder is a professor and a nun and lives in bay area. lives in alameda. she's here to chat with us and it's truly a pleasure. thank you for taking time here. let's begin with -- let's begin with you. you you grew up in michigan. born in chicago. cub or white sox fans i should ask. either one. at some point you decided to enter into the religious life. tell us about that decision and tell us about entering with the sisters. >> well, in catholic lingo the experience is a call. much like a call to ministry. or a call to be an artist. one is being invited to do something with one's life. and in this case, i suppose you could call it a special invitation of religion but a desire to spend one's life growing in union with god and serving god's people. >> so this c
CBS
Oct 21, 2012 5:00am PDT
and enjoy whatever is on the written word. we have two special guests with us and we will ask you, and sandra, what is your book about. >> daisy's word, a children's back from ages 0 to 10, daisy loves words and keeps track of words in a green work book covered with poke ca dots and word lists that she accumulates and she is a character that kids can relate to and i wanted to write a book to do with the theme of words but not academic. it is fun and brings into literature a character that is all about language that i have fun with myself and i find exciting. >> deb ra, what is your book about. >> my book is called spirit in nature teaching judiasm and ecology on the trail, it is a book to be used outside. when we wrote it in the cover, we said we hope it gets messy and full of the earth of leaves and grasses. i co-authored the book for jewish educators that did not know about nature and wanted to take kids outside and for naturalists that didn't know about judiasm, either type of person could pick up the book and take people outside and teach people on jewish themes. >> what i think is
CBS
Oct 28, 2012 5:00am PDT
for this station for having us. from community methodist church in fairfield, i've been the pastor for five years. people said that they will be watching us. if not, they'll tape it. today, we're going to be talking about dr. howard thurman. you may ask, who is howard thurman? he is one of the greatest religious figures of our times. and we are grateful to have the pastor who bounded that church in 1944. it's still active and very alive and a colleague of mine and friend, reverend dr. dorothy blake is the pastor since the nineties. great to see you, dorothy. >> thank you, and thank you for inviting me. >> glad to have you. >> i want to tell you how much i aappreciate your work not only as a pastor but a host for mosaic for 11 years. >> thank you. >> thank you for your commitment and the invitation to being here. you know, we went to school together >>> 40 years ago. >> what's been your journey to let people know who don't know you? >> on fad yaition from the pack school of religion, i worked as the assistant to the president of the -- at that time. the unfortunate of alabama was not in
CBS
Oct 7, 2012 5:00am PDT
or the exchange is that we get past what might keep us distant because of what unites us. >> archbishop, you've been 50 years a priest. congratulations. >> thank you. >> 17 years a bishop, and it must have been an exciting time for you. i want to ask you one of the better questions first. the church, you were happy to help us through the vatican 2 pump because you were ordained in 1962 so how was that? was how the church you knew, the church you know today, the church you see for the future? >> i think the church was growing even before the vatican council. it's always been growing and changing with each generation, but i think the vatican council really touched back into older traditions, not so much a whole new way of being catholic, but touching into traditions that have perhaps been lost or understated, for instance, having the worship as the language of the people. that's an old tradition, not a new idea. it was new to the mid 20th century but it was a renewal rather than bringing in something new and i think that was true for a lot of things, for our sacraments, und
LINKTV
Oct 17, 2012 7:30pm PDT
conflict for us. >> are you open year-round, and do you have a brochure? >> yes! [laughter] >> i think it's interesting, because we've just been through a session on judaism - the ancient myths and rituals stories - and both starhawk and margot adler - came out of intellectual, atheistic, radical jewish families. they are, in a sense, the contemporary flowering of judaism, in the sense that they are returning to very ancient roots, that old rock upon which all the world's religions, i believe, have been based. >> now which changes not. >> huh? >> now which changes not. >> ah, yes. >> well, the jewish tradition, in other words, is fulfilled in both margot adler and starhawk - they're both jewish. >> yes. >> that's the point i made. >> yeah, and i think that does also fit - back with judaism, we were talking about different interpretations of the genesis story, the alienation story, and i love your myth about leaving the fires, leaving it and going out and becoming, so that more relationship could happen, more interaction could happen, and you can see it in that form. do you know what we
LINKTV
Oct 10, 2012 7:30pm PDT
, because it's such a great example, and i would have loved to use this videotape, but we would have had to pay thousands of dollars in copyright fees, so i'll just have to describe it. but that's the idea of the sacramental. performative - our last feature, obviously - it's things that people do. and as janet said, i think that's one of the reasons it's such a primary function in terms of symbols, because people can get involved with it, they look forward to it, and really, they can count on it, they can count on it. and that brings us to our last feature here, it's repetitive. and as rabbi bronstein said, and we've heard in so many other instances, rituals are repetitive in two ways. now one, i use this term liturgical - i hope you're okay - that word is just usually the cycle of events, as people go through a year, you will count on those - the holidays, the rituals, the ceremonies, and we look forward to them; they bring meaning. talking about our - back to our wrestling - our tag team wrestling, the world wrestling, the lack of myth. well, we all know how we look so forward to a
LINKTV
Oct 1, 2012 7:30pm PDT
-column mansion. most of us lived in houses much more like these shacks. and i think that beverly has called attention to what's really one of the edominant housing varieties in the sth. she is honoring where a whole bunch of us came from. woman: as a child, beverly would accompany her father, walter buchanan, on his rounds, his visits to sharecroppers' homes and to tenant farmers' homes in his capacity as a state representative for agriculture, as well as for his position as the dean of the school of agriculture at the south carolina state college. woman: and although beverly never lived in a shack, they would get rained in, and beverly would get an opportunity to stay overnight in the shack communities. buchanan: so i was exposed to a lot of practical things. so i saw, you know, calves being born, and horses and pigs and little baby chickens. westmacott: and it may not have meant much to her when she was doing it as a young child, but it certainly has permeated her memory and her work today. and it can be seen in a lot of the photographs that her father actually took while they were
LINKTV
Oct 18, 2012 11:30am PDT
often able to "borrow"-- if i can use that word to describe how they get their services; but get access to water, get access to... arrange access to, uh... garbage collection or collect the garbage themselves and put it at a dump site where they know it will be collected eventually or get illegal connections to electrical wires... that over time ameliorate the kinds of conditions that they're in and actually give them hope and allow them to stay in their localities for long periods of time. like in many places, the squatters in delhi, many of them have been there for a decade or more. narrator: continual population pressures have also led to an explosion in the number of cars on the road, degrading air quality and bringing traffic to a virtual standstill. at the same time, factories are spewing tons of pollutants into the air. i think nothing has frightened me more than the change in air quality that you experience nowadays when you travel to delhi. when you land in the city, the first thing that you are aware of as you exit your airplane is the thickness of the air that surround
LINKTV
Oct 24, 2012 7:30pm PDT
- well, they'd be the first, you know, to use the technology. but he's keeping track of me- you know, he wants to make sure if i'm up on my reading and i get it, because he's so afraid that anybody that isn't inside that circle, they're going to hell. and i don't know, you know, it's just he's so genuine. yeah? >> there's just so much to say. first of all, hell is going to be really crowded that's the first problem, because they're going to have this nice little elite group up there. after watching him, i thought, the man must be so comforted to be so right, while the rest of us are so wrong. >> yes! oh, that's the feel you get. >> i mean, just absolutely. and then i do have a question. what was his explanation of, you know, why are there different christian religions, then, if his is the only right one? and why do the doctrines- >> satan! satan is out there, you know- i mean, the only thing worse than a 35,000-year-old ascended master is a presbyterian. and that's no slap on them; that's the attitude. mainstream christianity is even worse, because it's moving people, you know, away
LINKTV
Oct 11, 2012 7:30pm PDT
created us; without the females, we wouldn't be here. and that's the same way we believe we have a lot of respect for the female - the females. >> yeah, as you said - and i love this image with the sweat lodge - you're actually moving back into the womb, back into the mother earth. >> yeah, that's grandmother earth's womb. >> yeah, that's an amazing, concept in that area. question? >> yeah. i thought first you said your son was being raised in your wife's religion. >> no. >> now, it's just the opposite i hear. is it usually through the mother's religion, or each family decides which way the children will be raised? >> basically, it goes with the father - the father. and like i say, he's been raised - >> because you're ojibway. >> yeah, ojibway all his life, so he sings - i'm teaching him the songs of the ojibway. but yet i'm learning from my wife of her songs and i'm trying to learn - her language is one of the hardest languages to learn, the northern cheyenne tribe. >> the marriage ceremony, is that native american as well? is there any civil aspect? >> it's the same as any other
LINKTV
Oct 2, 2012 11:30am PDT
little, i have managed to reach a point at which i use no more than a small number of forms and colors this process found a culminating expression in his eightoot-high painting "femme," the maquette for the tial gallery's tapestry. miro entered the project with much enthusiasm, stating, "i'll go into this and fight it through with everything i have." over many months, the tapestry took shape in his imagination. finally, in 1976 it was set down rapidly as a maquette. in the ancient catalan city of tarragona, joan miro meets with young master weaver josep royo to discuss the transformation of his painting into a 10-meter-high tapestry. studying a photograph of the maquette, they consider how best to translate miro's art into a heavily- textured weaving, which would capture the spirit of his concept. royo has an enormous task before him. in this converted flour mill in tarragona, many months of preparation are needed before the weaving itself can begin. nearly four miles of heavy cotton line is measured, stretched and chained for use as the tapestry's vertical warp. royo has developed a u
LINKTV
Oct 9, 2012 11:30am PDT
into portraits of a gas lit world fuelled by restless energy. he could use his very fluent draftsmanship to give a sense of the most immediate, the most spontaneous recording and projecting of something seen in the modern world. that economy also spreads to the devices he uses, which bring the spectator of his works into the game. "i recognize that. i know that that's very up to date. i understand it. i am modern like the artist." and it's that interplay that he generates between the spectator and his audience that is very, very modern. (narrator) the painter of montmartre's decadence had an aristocratic start. born in 1864, henri raymond de toulouse-lautrec came from a noble and distinguished family-- count raymond of toulouse had helped capture jerusalem in the first crusade. henri's branch of the family came from the red-brick city of albi in the south of france. henri grew up in a world of chateaus and privilege in a family living on the fruits of its noble past. but a france governed by the middle class was losing its taste for nobility. like many aristocrats, his fath
LINKTV
Oct 2, 2012 7:30pm PDT
has been used probably in every film on the pacific made. (dramatic music playing) i'd like to know where the rest of the squad went. what's this? (machine gun firing) whatever it is, it ain't healthy! let's get outta here! (thomas doherty) because so many americans knew the second world war not in a full combat experience -- they'd certainly seen newsreels and combat reports of the time. that was a close one! they would no longer accept a backlot rendering of the war. so there is a movement toward what you'd call verisimilitude in the post-war era. (thomas doherty) these films often incorporate some newsreel footage. (gunfire and explosions) (leonard fribourg) i received orders to report to the studios. they'd made arrangements with the marine corps to get all the footage out here that they could look at that had been taken during combat in world war ii. we watched the film 5 to 7 hours a day. they were looking for combat and for things that were real that they could use in the movie. (explosion) (dramatic music playing) (whistling of bomb) (explosion) now, the closest i could thin
LINKTV
Oct 18, 2012 7:30pm PDT
interpretation of the life and teaching of jesus? and to use our analogy here, where does your belief move you ethically in terms of your behavior towards your fellow human beings out into society? and if society does not then measure up, what do you do? do you try to fix society? which jim jones certainly tried to do, and during the heyday of the mid seventies, or early seventies in san francisco, jones was even appointed to a position on the housing authority, i believe, by mayor george moscone - i think he was the one that was later assassinated by harvey milk, if i'm not mistaken. but in any event, jones had risen up to a position of respect in that very liberal community. but again, what goes wrong? well, rebecca will have some things to say about that, but just your thoughts or comments on it? sure. >> the headstone described them as victims. >> yes. >> is that accurate, when people choose their paths? >> darn good question. that's the a-number one $64,000 question - is a person a victim in that setting, when it goes to thought? >> i can see the four-year-old - >> yes, okay. >> - def
LINKTV
Oct 4, 2012 11:30am PDT
each one, employees use bicycles get around in time. tokyo train stations, otemachi and ginza, are at the core of tokyo. there is a dramatic difference between the daytime and nighttime population in this area. according to the 2000 census, over one million people work here, but only 40,000 people live here. that means for every 26 people here during the day, only one is here during the evening, and those other 25 are commuting in on public transit. in tokyo, the government and private industry have worked very, very hard to develop a very efficient rail transportation system. and there's actually more use of public transit in tokyo, i believe, per year than in the entire use of public transportation in the united states. so public transportation in tokyo is exceptional. we're talking about something like 40 million individual rides per day. narrator: japan is a mountainous country roughly the size of california. this physical geography has contributed to densely populated cities, and made japan one of the most highly urbanized countries in the world. over 80% of its population lives
LINKTV
Oct 23, 2012 8:00pm PDT
conquered smallpox in the americas in 1971 and worldwide in 1977, sort of lent us confidence that really, there wasn't much that we couldn't do. as a result, the center began to diversify, to broaden its focus. and so we expanded into chronic disease areas. the national institute for occupational safety and health was incorporated into cdc in the early 1970s. much more recently, we've gotten into areas surrounding injury control and prevention. and of course we realized in the last few years that the infectious disease agenda is not over. certainly it's not in the developing world where it still causes a very heavy burden. apart from what aids is doing as probably the most egregious example that we've seen in our lifetimes, having surpassed malaria as the largest killer of people in africa, is tuberculosis, for which we've had good drugs, haven't used them wisely or enough in years past to reduce some of the problems that we're seeing today. and that's getting more and more serious now with multiply resistant strains of tuberculosis. tuberculosis is the most common infectious agen
LINKTV
Oct 25, 2012 11:30am PDT
africa and southwestern asia takes us to egypt. here, as throughout this region, the presence or absence of water has profoundly influenced patterns of human settlement. the nile river is egypt's lifeblood. people here cling to its path through the desert and cluster in its broad delta. our case explores human modification of the environment as humans harness the mighty nile through projects like the aswan dam, lake nasser and the new toshka canal; the move from subsistence to commercial agriculture; and how an expanding population in the nile river delta is encroaching on the area's remaining precious farmland. from space, the earth can seem an abstract pattern of color and shape, but as we look closer, environmental processes come into view. here the rain of east-central africa collects in the giant lake victoria. its waters drain to the north, giving rise o of the world's great rirs, the nile descending from the african highlands, the nile winds through one of earth's most arid landscapes. coursing through the vast desert of northern africa, the waters of the nile nourish a ri
LINKTV
Oct 9, 2012 7:30pm PDT
that was part of the whole conceit of noir, of using lighting techniques to alter space psychologically. you can't underestimate the german influence in it all. and all the german expatriates who were filling the ranks of the hollywood crafts as well as director and writer. and they brought with them a dramatic and visual tradition that was very different from the more vaudeville or the more showman tradition of american films of the time. (john bailey) fritz lang did a trilogy of early gangster films, of the mabuse trilogy which had tremendous influence, not only in german cinema, but also in this country. even going back before that, "the cabinet of dr. caligari," the sets were built in false perspective. tremendous sense of light and dark contrasts. tilted angles, foregrounding of objects. these became very prominent, i think, in film noir. (abraham polonsky) objects are not things that happen to be in a room. objects are things that we deal with in living. so floors are objects. the position of people towards each other are objects. when you make a movie you pay atte
LINKTV
Oct 30, 2012 7:30pm PDT
were, oh, wow, we gotta use that one. that's the one. but in the movie, where the camera pans away, that was the more powerful one. you could dismiss the other one because of its shock value. it was easier to explain away. the other one where your imagination takes it is the one that disturbs people. i wanted it to be disturbing. everyone talks about the violence scene in "dogs" as, god, it's just unbearable, people walk out and so on. when i saw it, women just left in droves at that scene. but it does create a selling point. and i think that something people perhaps overlook a bit in this kind of rarefied world of american art cinema, independent cinema is that there still has to be something to sell in them and that's exploitable. (narrator) while tarantino uses the spectacle of violence to propel his story forward, in "one false move," carl franklin portrays violence in a different way. i wanted people to experience a loss of humanity, the invasion of humanity, which is what happens when somebody dies, you know, somebody who was alive, somebody who had dreams, somebody who was l
LINKTV
Oct 4, 2012 7:30pm PDT
my younger brother. you know, he's gone back to selling used cars, and i don't think he reads the bible any way. but no, the story in there, the power of it, is what we're looking at in myth. and again, like we said, you could just imagine how people reading that could pick up on the things that were so important to them. another thing is, oftentimes people will say, "oh, america is a christian nation." and 88 percent of the people who are some form of religion in this country are christians, so you can say anything you want, i suppose, and get away with it. but not really so, a christian nation, because the first amendment to the u.s. constitution separates church and state. however, i always like to say, "well, in some senses, it's a christian nation, but it most certainly is a jewish nation, because that whole creation, liberation, exodus, making of a holy land - we've got towns around here called zion or new canaan or whatever - what the whole drama - and again, i'm not making this up, folks, as dave barry would say - the ministers on the boats, like the arabella , coming into
LINKTV
Oct 29, 2012 7:30pm PDT
to solve in this period of time. siqueiros uses a structure called polyangular theory. in that position -- you fall into his position. then all the corners of the wall disappear. the project that i'm working on now is a mural i designed for the usc student center with input from the latino student body. this mural is the focal point of a long struggle for the students at usc, who have struggled to assert their presence both in numbers and in sensibilities. we will use these lines to take to the center of our figures. and he figured them in mathematically... i call myself a chicana, because being a chicana means that i understand that i am in a position of the resistance of assimilation, essentially saying we will maintain our sensibility, that we are border people, that we live in the space between both the united states and mexico, that we are of neither and of both, and that we are, particularly, a people who...have a political point of view. and this is essentially the bones of the work. this will be like the bones -- what will hold the whole piece together so that not any p
LINKTV
Oct 15, 2012 7:30pm PDT
work. it's all mine, so i use it. what is really endlessly amusing to me is how different an image can be with only the slightest change in it, and how something will look quite strange or other than you expected. here are two images which look so different, and they actually come off the identical drawings. the name of it is "escape." here it is in the full spectrum of colors. and here are the same plates in black, white, and gray. in here, this little bit of energy escapes from the picture plane. here the same thing is happening, but they're like night and day. as an example of how ideas come to me, one day i was riding through the third street tunnel in los angeles, and i noticed it looked almost as though the tunnel were breaking up on both sides. the dividing line down the center sort of rose up and broke into pieces. and as the cars sped by, i realized that off in the distance everything was in focus, but everything was moving in periphery. it made the experience of the tunnel very dynamic. and i could see that the normal shape of the tunnel was breaking down and becoming som
LINKTV
Oct 11, 2012 11:30am PDT
indonesia. still use the methods passed down from their grandfathers. but life around them is chaing. it's a lot greener some of those roadsideught stalls look interesting. yeah, might do those tomorrow still haven't worked out the money though. ( people clamoring, airport announcements ) narror: balias bn a ist mecca for more tn 50 years. still haven't worked out the money though. ( people clamoring, turistsng money and jobs, wo but they also bring with them dierent cultural values. still haven't worked out the money though. ( peoptourist:ring, turistsng ...with the headdress. they're hiu laes. what's the religion here? uh, they're muslims. narrator: maintaining a strong sense of identity uhs been a challenge for bali as it embraces economi de. there seem to be an awfulot o tourist buses, too yeah, i've seen a lot of tousts in tse four-wheel drives, too. tourist: yeah? in tsecomefrusall drives, too. becausit's so ar. and they le the sun, the beach, the beer and so on. welso y nese who are of placesal ople who are retired who come he for the peace and quiet. also, a of ameca come her
LINKTV
Oct 5, 2012 7:30pm PDT
you have the right to remain silent. you have the right to be heard. anything you say can be used against you... what you say will be listened to with dignity and respect. you have the right to information and assistance. [ cell door closes ] justice isn't served until crime victims are.
LINKTV
Oct 16, 2012 11:30am PDT
excavations will tell. but major discoverieare being unearthed each year, brinng us closer t a fuller understanding of that extraordinary culture we call olmec. ( nave drums beating ) ( music ) you have the right to remain silent. you have the right to be heard. anything you say can be used against you... what you say will be listened to with dignity and respect. you have the right to information and assistance. [ cell door closes ] justice isn't served until crime victims are.
LINKTV
Oct 24, 2012 11:30am PDT
devastating, just very devastating, and the victims' program provided the resources for us to get the counseling that we needed. alec was also injured. they helped pay for alec's cornea transplant. they stood by us through the court process. if you or someone you love have been a victim of violent crime, there is help available for you.
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)